Norfolk generally has an older population that is projected to increase at a greater rate than the rest of England. Almost all of the population increase over the last five years has been in those aged over 65. Over the next ten years the total population is expected to increase by 50,700 with most of the increase expected in the 65 and over age bands. By 2041, the population aged 85+ is estimated to double in size. This will mean there are nearly 61,000 people in Norfolk aged 85 and over and they will require planning for different types of accommodation and housing. Modelled estimates indicate that the 75 and over population of Norfolk is likely to require about 15,000 nursing and residential beds and 7,000 housing with care units. The increasing numbers of older people also mean that it is likely to increase the need for palliative care. The area of Norfolk with the highest numbers of older people is North Norfolk. One risk factor for poor mental health for the older generation is loneliness and social isolation, although this issue can affect everyone regardless of age. Older people that are widowed and/or have long-term health conditions are at particular risk of experiencing loneliness more often. At age 65 about 2 out of 3 people live in a couple, including civil partnerships and cohabiting, at age 85 this has reduced to about 1 in 3. Another risk factor for loneliness is deprivation, whether in urban or rural areas. It has been shown that those living in deprived areas are more often lonely compared to people living in non-deprived areas. However, being in a rural isolated area doesn’t automatically mean someone is lonely. It has been shown that people living in deprived urban areas, or an area where crime is a problem, can be just as lonely.

Last updated: Aug-18

Mental health


Mental health and wellbeing is an important factor at any age for staying generally well and active. One risk factor for poor mental health for the older generation is loneliness and social isolation, although this issue can affect everyone regardless of age. Older people that are widowed and/or have long-term health conditions are at particular risk of experiencing loneliness more often. At age 65 about 2 out of 3 people live in a couple, including civil partnerships and cohabiting, at age 85 this has reduced to about 1 in 3. Another risk factor for loneliness is deprivation, whether in urban or rural areas. It has been shown that those living in deprived areas are more often lonely compared to people living in non-deprived areas. However, being in a rural isolated area doesn’t automatically mean someone is lonely. It has been shown that people living in deprived urban areas, or an area where crime is a problem, can be just as lonely. Latest research shows that across Norfolk between 5% – 13% of adults will often, or always, be feeling lonely. Of all the users of adult social care, 49.3% report that they have as much social contact as they would like.Dementia prevalence for people of all ages in Norfolk is higher than the England rate. However, it is lower than England for the 65-years and over population.

Last updated: Aug-18
Mental health resources
Living in Norfolk with dementia health needs assessment
2014 | Norfolk County Council


Mental health needs assessment
2013 | Norfolk County Council


General health

Outcomes for older people in Norfolk are generally good and older people’s rating of their health related quality of life is significantly higher than England. Emergency admissions for injuries related to falls is lower than England but there were still 1,200 emergency admissions for broken hips in 2016/17. Across Norfolk as a whole there are nearly 50,000 emergency hospital admissions for people aged 65 and over each year. Flu can increase someones risk of hospital admission and in Norfolk almost 156,000, or 72.7%, people aged 65-years and over are immunised against flu each year.

Last updated: Aug-18
General health resources
Falls prevention in Norfolk health needs assessment
Apr-14 | Norfolk County Council


Excess winter deaths reports by CCG
Dec-14 | Norfolk County Council


Long term conditions

Long-term condition levels increase in the older age group and modelled estimates indicate that the 75 and over population of Norfolk is likely to require about 15,000 nursing and residential beds and more than 6,000 housing with care units. The increasing numbers of older people also mean that it is likely to increase the need for palliative care for about 7,700 deaths by 2025. Steps taken at an earlier age can prevent some of these conditions such as changes to alcohol consumption, obesity and exercise.

Last updated: Aug-18
Long term conditions resources

Oral health


Norfolk’s population is set to increase during the next decade, with more significant increases in adult and older age groups than among children. There are already higher proportions of older people in Norfolk. Older people are more likely to have complex dental care needs due to treatment patterns earlier in their lives. There is a well established link between deprivation and poor oral health. Vulnerable people are more likely to seek dental treatment when they have a problem. Health promotion targeted and drop-in style services are particularly needed in areas of deprivation. Almost 51% of the adult population has been seen by a dentist in the previous 24 months, however there is a proportion of the population who are not accessing services for regular checks and prevention.

Last updated: Aug-18
Oral health resources

Living independently & well


At age 65 about 2 out of 3 people live in a couple, including civil partnerships and cohabiting, at age 85 this has reduced to about 1 in 3. Another risk factor for loneliness is deprivation, whether in urban or rural areas. It has been shown that those living in deprived areas are more often lonely compared to people living in non-deprived areas. However, being in a rural isolated area doesn’t automatically mean someone is lonely. It has been shown that people living in deprived urban areas, or an area where crime is a problem, can be just as lonely. Latest research shows that across Norfolk between 5% – 13% of adults will often, or always, be feeling lonely. Of all the users of adult social care, 49.3% report that they have as much social contact as they would like.More people die during the winter months compared to the number during the summer months; the majority of Excess Winter Deaths occur among the 75+ age group. Factors include winter temperatures, how well people are able to cope with low temperatures, disease levels in the neighbourhood such as seasonal flu, and falling over, whether at home or elsewhere.

Last updated: Aug-18
Living independently & well resources
Living in Norfolk with dementia health needs assessment
2014 | Norfolk County Council


Falls prevention in Norfolk health needs assessment
Apr-14 | Norfolk County Council


End of life care


End of life services aim to support people approaching the end of their life to live as well as possible until they die. Two-thirds of those who die each year nationally are over 75 years old. In Norfolk this is approximately 2,600 under the age of 75 years and 6,800 over, the majority in hospital following a period of illness. Long-term condition levels increase in the older age group and modelled estimates indicate that the 75 and over population of Norfolk is likely to require about 15,000 nursing and residential beds and more than 7,000 housing with care units. The increasing numbers of older people also mean that it is likely to increase the need for palliative care for about 7,700 deaths by 2025.

Last updated: Aug-18
End of life care resources
Excess winter deaths reports by CCG
Dec-14 | Norfolk County Council


Carers


Over 90,000 people in Norfolk provide unpaid informal care every year which would cost the taxpayer over £500m to buy. Over half of carers are female, the majority of carers are over 50; just under 40% are aged 50-64 and just under 30% are 65 and over. There is an increased demand on the Carers of older people with Long-term conditions. The health and wellbeing of carers is also reported to be affected by the levels of caring, with Carers who care for someone for more than 50 hours a week twice as likely to be in poor health as non-carers.Carers UK report “Alone and caring” reveal 8 out of 10 carers have felt lonely or isolated as a result of their caring responsibilities. 57% had lost touch with friends and family and 38% of carers in full time employment have felt isolated from other people at work.

Last updated: Aug-18
Carers resources

Safeguarding

Norfolk Safeguarding Adults Board annual report 2016-17 reported Physical abuse as the most common type of abuse, that 50% of safeguarding enquiries were fully substantiated, more women than men were likely to be at risk and that 89% of people said they now felt safe after the safeguarding enquiry. The cost of treating physical health of victims of domestic abuse is £1.25 billion and the cost of the resulting mental disorders as £176 million (3% of the health budget). (Office of the Police and Crime commissioner for Norfolk).

Last updated: Aug-18
Safeguarding resources